What to do if your dog gets stung by a bee or wasp?

11 Dogs Who Learned The Hard Way Not To Eat Bees via Buzzfeed
"Guysh. Shtop laughing."
 
2. ”I shought beesh were for eatshing.”
    
3. ”Sherioushly. Itsh nosh funny.”
    
4. ”I shink the shwelling shtopped.”
5. ”No, waish, my fashe ish jusht numb.”
    
6. ”Doesh itsh look bad?”
7. ”Oh gosh, shish ish sho embarrashing.”
8. ”I can’sh believe shish ish happening.”
    
9. ”Shtop shtaring!”
    
10. ”Pleashe don’tsh shtell anyone.”
    
11. ”Shanks. You’re susch a good friend.”

What to do if your dog gets stung
by a bee or wasp?

Dogs are curious. They love to run and chase things including insects, which in some cases protect themselves by stinging the dog. 

Multiple stings are dangerous. Most of the time, an insect sting is just painful and irritating for your dog. Getting stung several times, or stung inside the mouth or throat, is dangerous and requires a trip to the veterinarian.

Bee and wasp stings are poisons. The two most common types of stinging insects are bees and wasps. It’s not the small puncture wound that causes the sting’s pain, but the small amount of poison that is injected.

  • A bee’s stinger is barbed and designed to lodge in the skin, killing the bee when the stinger detaches from the body
  • Wasp stingers are not barbed but are more painful, and if provoked these insects can sting multiple times

Most of the time dogs get stung on their faces from investigating a stinging insect too closely. A sting on your dog’s sensitive nose is particularly painful. Some dogs may even get stung on the tongue or inside their mouth or throat if they try to bite or catch an insect. These stings can be dangerous. If the dog is stung many times, he could go into shock as a result of absorbed toxins. Occasionally, anaphylactic shock develops in a dog who has been stung in the past. The subsequent swelling can close your dog’s throat and block its airway.

While it might look funny, we recommend that you watch for allergic reactions before taking pictures of your dog’s swollen face. A severe reaction can be caused by a large number of stings or by an allergic reaction. Signs of a reaction include:

  • General weakness
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea 
  • Seizuring 
  • Drooling
  • A large amount of swelling extending away from the sting site

If your dog is having a severe reaction, you need to take the dog to a vet immediately.


 

A simple sting can be safely left alone. It should be bothersome only temporarily. If a stinger is still present, try to remove it by scraping it with a fingernail, credit card or a rigid piece of cardboard. Avoid using tweezers or forceps to remove it unless absolutely necessary as this may force more venom out of the stinger.

Administer a remedy for the pain. Applying a weak mixture of water and baking soda to the affected area will help reduce the pain or apply calamine lotion. You can also wrap ice or an icepack in a towel and apply it to the wound to reduce swelling and pain.

Maintain a watchful eye on your dog. Observe your dog closely after the sting incident to ensure an allergic reaction doesn’t develop. If several days pass and the swelling doesn’t go down, notify us! 

All about Roundworms (Ascarids)

image

Infestation of Roundworms (Ascarids) is caused by ingestion of roundworm eggs, often through coprophagia (eating feces), ingesting contaminated food or water, eating infected rodents, and by licking surfaces affected with roundworm eggs. They can also be passed down to puppies and kittens from the milk of an infected mother and during embryonic development. 

Adult roundworms live inside a host animal and feed off their nutrients in order to grow. Once the worm has matured, it lays eggs which are passed through feces. It is important to note that a heavy burden of worms will result in visible larvae in the stool. Roundworms eggs are very tough and can live in the environment for months to years, surviving through harsh climates until they enter a new host and hatch into larvae. The larvae enter the bloodstream, migrate into the lungs which causes the animal to cough up, swallowing the larvae. The larvae enter the small intestines where they leech off of the hosts food until they mature and begin mating and  laying eggs, thus completing the cycle. 

"How did my dog get roundworms in the winter? He’s a senior and hardly goes outside!"

We had a client ask this question upon finding spaghetti-like worms in her dogs feces last night. These worms can be identified as Roundworms, a species that infects both cats and dogs as well as humans. In order to answer this question it is important to understand the life cycle of the roundworm. 

During the winter months, animals spend more time grooming themselves and by doing so ingest tiny eggs that may be present on their fur or feet from walking on infested areas. Because these eggs can stay dormant for so long, it may be weeks or months before they fully develop. Based on the stage of the eggs or larvae, the time it takes for symptoms to appear can vary. 

If your pet goes to the groomers or boarding facilities, there is an increased risk of picking up roundworm eggs.

Symptoms of roundworms include: 
- Bloat or a potbellied appearance, especially common in younger animals
- Diarrhea
- Vomiting
- Lethargy
- Coughing
- Weight loss
- Abdominal discomfort or whining 

Luckily, roundworm infestations are fairly easy to treat. Veterinary clinics carry many different products used for deworming. These medications are harmless to your pets but will kill the parasites in their intestines. 

Keep in mind that you may see worms (sometimes lives ones!) pass out of your pet with their stool within 8-48 hours of administering the dewormer. Don’t be alarmed - this just means the medication is working! Your pet may continue to pass dead and/or alive worms for the next couple of days until everything has been cleared out. A second or third dose of deworming is recommended in cases where there is a heavy burden of roundworms and is a good way of making sure all the worms have been eliminated.

We recommend regular deworming! 

zooborns

zooborns:

Lincoln Children’s Zoo Hand-raises Baby Tammar Wallaby

A seven-month-old Tammar Wallaby joey is one of the newest additions to the Lincoln Children’s Zoo. Liv the Wallaby joey was found out of her mother’s pouch one morning and was immediately rescued by zookeepers. Still being hand-raised, Liv is carried in a make-shift pouch to substitute the body warmth and shelter provided by a Wallaby mother’s pouch.

Learn more at Zooborns.

Why do pets need their baby teeth removed? When your pet’s adult teeth get ready to emerge, the baby teeth fall out to make room for them to come in. If the baby tooth and the permanent adult tooth are in the same socket in the jaw, the adult tooth has to squeeze in next it. A baby tooth that has stayed in the mouth is known as a retained deciduous tooth. Crowding between the adult tooth and the retained deciduous tooth increases the likelihood that food and debris will become trapped between them and creates a convenient spot for tartar to collect. When tartar accumulates, the gums become inflamed and pull away from the teeth - a condition known as gingivitis. With the gums pulled back, bacteria can now travel beneath the gum line causing infection and decay of the tooth root. Bacterial toxins and the body’s natural response to infection start to break down the bone and connective tissue that hold teeth in place. If not treated, the bones, gums, and tissue that support the teeth are destroyed. This is known as stage 4 dental disease, an irreversible disease of the mouth.It is important to note that not all deciduous teeth will crowd the adult teeth and cause damage to this extent. If there is enough space around the retained tooth it is safe to leave it alone. Deciduous teeth that are stuck against the adult teeth should be removed as they will typically not fall out on their own.The picture below is of a retained deciduous canine tooth that was found during a dental exam this month. Although the dog was young, tartar accumulation and gingivitis is already evident between the adult and the retained tooth while the rest of the teeth in the mouth look healthy. This tooth was removed while the dog was under anesthetic for his neuter.If retained deciduous teeth are found during your pet’s complementary dental exam on the day of their surgery we will give you a call to discuss removing it on the same day rather than having them go under anesthetic a second time.

Why do pets need their baby teeth removed? 

When your pet’s adult teeth get ready to emerge, the baby teeth fall out to make room for them to come in. If the baby tooth and the permanent adult tooth are in the same socket in the jaw, the adult tooth has to squeeze in next it. A baby tooth that has stayed in the mouth is known as a retained deciduous tooth. 

Crowding between the adult tooth and the retained deciduous tooth increases the likelihood that food and debris will become trapped between them and creates a convenient spot for tartar to collect. When tartar accumulates, the gums become inflamed and pull away from the teeth - a condition known as gingivitis. 

With the gums pulled back, bacteria can now travel beneath the gum line causing infection and decay of the tooth root. Bacterial toxins and the body’s natural response to infection start to break down the bone and connective tissue that hold teeth in place. If not treated, the bones, gums, and tissue that support the teeth are destroyed. This is known as stage 4 dental disease, an irreversible disease of the mouth.

It is important to note that not all deciduous teeth will crowd the adult teeth and cause damage to this extent. If there is enough space around the retained tooth it is safe to leave it alone. Deciduous teeth that are stuck against the adult teeth should be removed as they will typically not fall out on their own.

The picture below is of a retained deciduous canine tooth that was found during a dental exam this month. Although the dog was young, tartar accumulation and gingivitis is already evident between the adult and the retained tooth while the rest of the teeth in the mouth look healthy. This tooth was removed while the dog was under anesthetic for his neuter.

If retained deciduous teeth are found during your pet’s complementary dental exam on the day of their surgery we will give you a call to discuss removing it on the same day rather than having them go under anesthetic a second time.