zooborns

zooborns:

Lincoln Children’s Zoo Hand-raises Baby Tammar Wallaby

A seven-month-old Tammar Wallaby joey is one of the newest additions to the Lincoln Children’s Zoo. Liv the Wallaby joey was found out of her mother’s pouch one morning and was immediately rescued by zookeepers. Still being hand-raised, Liv is carried in a make-shift pouch to substitute the body warmth and shelter provided by a Wallaby mother’s pouch.

Learn more at Zooborns.

Why do pets need their baby teeth removed? When your pet’s adult teeth get ready to emerge, the baby teeth fall out to make room for them to come in. If the baby tooth and the permanent adult tooth are in the same socket in the jaw, the adult tooth has to squeeze in next it. A baby tooth that has stayed in the mouth is known as a retained deciduous tooth. Crowding between the adult tooth and the retained deciduous tooth increases the likelihood that food and debris will become trapped between them and creates a convenient spot for tartar to collect. When tartar accumulates, the gums become inflamed and pull away from the teeth - a condition known as gingivitis. With the gums pulled back, bacteria can now travel beneath the gum line causing infection and decay of the tooth root. Bacterial toxins and the body’s natural response to infection start to break down the bone and connective tissue that hold teeth in place. If not treated, the bones, gums, and tissue that support the teeth are destroyed. This is known as stage 4 dental disease, an irreversible disease of the mouth.It is important to note that not all deciduous teeth will crowd the adult teeth and cause damage to this extent. If there is enough space around the retained tooth it is safe to leave it alone. Deciduous teeth that are stuck against the adult teeth should be removed as they will typically not fall out on their own.The picture below is of a retained deciduous canine tooth that was found during a dental exam this month. Although the dog was young, tartar accumulation and gingivitis is already evident between the adult and the retained tooth while the rest of the teeth in the mouth look healthy. This tooth was removed while the dog was under anesthetic for his neuter.If retained deciduous teeth are found during your pet’s complementary dental exam on the day of their surgery we will give you a call to discuss removing it on the same day rather than having them go under anesthetic a second time.

Why do pets need their baby teeth removed? 

When your pet’s adult teeth get ready to emerge, the baby teeth fall out to make room for them to come in. If the baby tooth and the permanent adult tooth are in the same socket in the jaw, the adult tooth has to squeeze in next it. A baby tooth that has stayed in the mouth is known as a retained deciduous tooth. 

Crowding between the adult tooth and the retained deciduous tooth increases the likelihood that food and debris will become trapped between them and creates a convenient spot for tartar to collect. When tartar accumulates, the gums become inflamed and pull away from the teeth - a condition known as gingivitis. 

With the gums pulled back, bacteria can now travel beneath the gum line causing infection and decay of the tooth root. Bacterial toxins and the body’s natural response to infection start to break down the bone and connective tissue that hold teeth in place. If not treated, the bones, gums, and tissue that support the teeth are destroyed. This is known as stage 4 dental disease, an irreversible disease of the mouth.

It is important to note that not all deciduous teeth will crowd the adult teeth and cause damage to this extent. If there is enough space around the retained tooth it is safe to leave it alone. Deciduous teeth that are stuck against the adult teeth should be removed as they will typically not fall out on their own.

The picture below is of a retained deciduous canine tooth that was found during a dental exam this month. Although the dog was young, tartar accumulation and gingivitis is already evident between the adult and the retained tooth while the rest of the teeth in the mouth look healthy. This tooth was removed while the dog was under anesthetic for his neuter.

If retained deciduous teeth are found during your pet’s complementary dental exam on the day of their surgery we will give you a call to discuss removing it on the same day rather than having them go under anesthetic a second time.

Reverse Sneezing - What is it?
The easiest way to explain reverse sneezing is to first define a regular sneeze: the rapid motion of pushing air out the nostrils. Reverse sneezing is the opposite where rather than pushing air out, air is rapidly pulled into the nose. When this happens your pet will make deep and long inspirations, stand still, and extend his head and neck. A loud snorting sound is produced, which may make you think your pet has something caught in his nose or throat. A reverse sneezing episode can last for several seconds to a minute.
This is a condition most commonly seen in small breed dogs, perhaps because they have smaller throats and windpipes.
Brachycephalic breeds, like pugs and bulldogs, with elongated soft palates, occasionally suck the palate into the throat, which can cause an episode of reverse sneezing.
While it may be alarming, reverse sneezing is not a dangerous or life-threatening condition. However, it can be a symptom of something serious. If your pet’s reverse sneezing seems to be affecting his/her quality of life, if episodes seem to be lasting longer or if they are happening more frequently we recommend bringing your pet in for a visit as it may be related an upper respiratory tract infection (such as Kennel Cough), nasal tumors, nasal polyps, a foreign body in the nasal passage, etc.
Some of our clients have reported their pets getting almost immediate relief from an episode of reverse sneezing by briefly covering their nostrils. This technique forces them to breath through their mouth. To do this, place your fingertips over your pet’s nostrils for no more than fifteen seconds. Once your pet inhales through their mouth the reverse sneezing should cease. Stop immediately if this adds to your pet’s distress and instead gently stroke their neck to help calm them down. 
Does your pet experience reverse sneezing? Is there anything you do to help your pet during an episode? We want to know! The content provided by the author of Acadia Veterinary Clinic’s blog and website is for purposes of providing information only and is not meant to be a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always consult your Veterinary Care Provider or other Veterinary Care Professional with any question regarding your pet’s health.

Reverse Sneezing - What is it?

The easiest way to explain reverse sneezing is to first define a regular sneeze: the rapid motion of pushing air out the nostrils. Reverse sneezing is the opposite where rather than pushing air out, air is rapidly pulled into the nose. When this happens your pet will make deep and long inspirations, stand still, and extend his head and neck. A loud snorting sound is produced, which may make you think your pet has something caught in his nose or throat. A reverse sneezing episode can last for several seconds to a minute.

This is a condition most commonly seen in small breed dogs, perhaps because they have smaller throats and windpipes.

Brachycephalic breeds, like pugs and bulldogs, with elongated soft palates, occasionally suck the palate into the throat, which can cause an episode of reverse sneezing.

While it may be alarming, reverse sneezing is not a dangerous or life-threatening condition. However, it can be a symptom of something serious. If your pet’s reverse sneezing seems to be affecting his/her quality of life, if episodes seem to be lasting longer or if they are happening more frequently we recommend bringing your pet in for a visit as it may be related an upper respiratory tract infection (such as Kennel Cough), nasal tumors, nasal polyps, a foreign body in the nasal passage, etc.

Some of our clients have reported their pets getting almost immediate relief from an episode of reverse sneezing by briefly covering their nostrils. This technique forces them to breath through their mouth. To do this, place your fingertips over your pet’s nostrils for no more than fifteen seconds. Once your pet inhales through their mouth the reverse sneezing should cease. Stop immediately if this adds to your pet’s distress and instead gently stroke their neck to help calm them down. 

Does your pet experience reverse sneezing? Is there anything you do to help your pet during an episode? We want to know! 

The content provided by the author of Acadia Veterinary Clinic’s blog and website is for purposes of providing information only and is not meant to be a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always consult your Veterinary Care Provider or other Veterinary Care Professional with any question regarding your pet’s health.